Snapguide

How to draw a cube

How to draw a cube accurately with mini tutorial on perspective.

4
STEPS
TOOLS

First off, you'll need a quick crash course on perspective if you want your cube to look real and accurate. Linear perspective is comprised of one point, two point and three point compositions.

Linear perspective was rediscovered by Italian Renaissance architect and artist Filippo Brunelleschi around 1420, after probable knowledge of it was lost in Ancient Greece/Rome.

It is used by many architects, draftsmen and landscape painters today. I will try and break it down as brief and simple as I can.

ONE POINT PERSPECTIVE CUBES

ONE POINT PERSPECTIVE CUBES

TWO POINT PERSPECTIVE CUBES

TWO POINT PERSPECTIVE CUBES

THREE POINT PERSPECTIVE CUBES (skyscrapers)

THREE POINT PERSPECTIVE CUBES (skyscrapers)

For this tutorial, I will be demonstrating how to draw a cube in two point.

For this tutorial, I will be demonstrating how to draw a cube in two point.

Pick up a light graphite pencil. Preferably 2H or lighter, so if you mess up, you can erase it completely. *Feel free to use a ruler or straight-edge.*

Pick up a light graphite pencil. Preferably 2H or lighter, so if you mess up, you can erase it completely. *Feel free to use a ruler or straight-edge.*

Here is what mine looked like after the first layer of background with my H pencil.

Here is what mine looked like after the first layer of background with my H pencil.

Here is what it looked like after the second layer.

Here is what it looked like after the second layer.

  • 1.0 Set of staedtler graphite pencils (19 count)
  • 1.0 Pencil sharpener
  • 1.0 White paper
  • 1.0 Tortillon/blending stump (optional)